The 22nd ARRC Symposium

Saturday 21 March 2020
De Vere Venues Holborn Bars
138-142 Holborn
London EC1N 2NQ

Terje Alræk

Terje Alræk

  1. Acupuncture in sham device controlled trials may not be as effective as acupuncture in the real world: a preliminary network meta-analysis of studies of acupuncture for hot flashes in menopausal women
  2. Acupuncture for cancer related fatigue - status/what do we know by now and information about a new study in Norway
 

Terje Alræk has been a clinical acupuncturist for more than 35 years. He trained as an acupuncturist at The International College of Oriental Medicine, England, 1979-82, and in Chinese herbal medicine in Oslo 1997-98. In 1994 he became involved in research in acupuncture and defended in 2004 his thesis "Acupuncture in the prevention of recurrent uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection in adult women" at the Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Alræk was the first acupuncturist in Norway who received a PhD in Health Service Research/Acupuncture. The Norway-China Cooperation in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is coordinated by NAFKAM, at The Arctic University of Norway (Tromsø). Terje Alræk is the project manager and a Senior Researcher there. He is also a professor at School of Health Sciences, Kristiania University College (Oslo).

His major research interest has been in women's health issues such as e.g. recurrent cystitis, postmenopausal hot flashes and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). His research is also related to Pattern Identification as found in TCM and other traditional East Asian medicine. He is involved in an extensive research network internationally. He has also given lectures at a large number of national and international conferences, especially on TCM acupuncture. Recently he, as the PI, received funding from Pink Ribbon/The Norwegian Cancer Association to do a RCT on acupuncture's potential effectiveness on chronic fatigue in breast cancer survivors.  He has published several peer review articles (47).

 
 
Karen Charlesworth

Karen Charlesworth

Acupuncture and nutritional therapy for atrial fibrillation: a feasibility study [title tbc]

 

under construction

 
 
Rachel Edney

Rachel Edney

Exploring acupuncture as a modern healthcare solution: a BAcC report

 

Rachel Edney graduated from Leicester University with a degree in biological sciences in 1996. She managed a team of writers in a London-based medical marketing agency from 2001, and has been working as a freelance medical writer and editor since 2005, producing educational material in line with market-shaping strategy for the pharmaceutical industry.
Rachel qualified as an acupuncturist from the School of Five Element Acupuncture in London in 2005. She currently works at a multidisciplinary clinic in Pembrokeshire which she owns and manages. She is the British Acupuncture Council Regional Group Coordinator for the South West Wales region.

 
 
John Hughes

John Hughes

‘I’m not too bad with needles’: evaluating self-acupuncture as a self-care intervention

 

Dr John Hughes is the Director of Research for the Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, UCLH NHS Trust. He is also Visiting Fellow within the Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton; Co-Chair of the Research Council for Complementary Medicine; and works closely with the World Health Organisation on the subject of traditional medicine.

John leads an interdisciplinary programme of mixed methods research centred on patients’ experiences of chronic illness and the alleviation of symptoms using integrated medicine and self-management techniques.  The programme of research has received over one million pounds in funding, and includes awards from the National Institute for Health Research and World Health Organisation. The research has been disseminated in over 50 peer reviewed academic publications.

 
 
Jianping Liu

Jianping Liu

Acupuncture trials in China: Pros and Cons

 

Jianping Liu is a Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and the Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine at the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. He is an advisor for traditional medicine for the World Health Organization (WHO), and is a Chang Jiang Scholar Professor (awarded by the Ministry of Education, China). He is a part-time senior researcher at the National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), at the Arctic University of Norway, and an adjunct professor of the University of Western Sydney. He is the current president of the International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR). He is a member of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Advisory Board and Chairman of the Evidence-based Medicine Committee under the Chinese Association of Integrative Medicine. Dr Liu has authored 9 books, co-authored 8, and published more than 520 papers in both international and Chinese peer review journals.

 
 
Hugh MacPherson

Hugh MacPherson

Acupuncture not recommended by NICE for osteoarthritis or low back pain despite the evidence: exploring the decision-making.

 

Hugh MacPherson is Professor of Acupuncture Research at the University of York, UK. He trained as a practitioner of acupuncture in the early 1980’s and continues to practice acupuncture in York. He is the founder of the Northern College of Acupuncture and the Foundation for Research into Traditional Chinese Medicine. He subsequently was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship based at the Department of Health Sciences, University of York.  Since then his research into acupuncture has included safety studies, clinical trials, qualitative studies and systematic reviews. His trials have evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for a variety of conditions, including low back pain, irritable bowel syndrome, depression and chronic neck pain. He has also conducted neuroimaging studies exploring potential mechanisms of acupuncture. He is lead editor of the book, “Acupuncture research: strategies for building an evidence base” and co-editor of, “The integration of East Asian medicine into contemporary healthcare”, both published by Elsevier.

 
 
Jonquil Westwood Pinto

Jonquil Westwood Pinto

Do traditional acupuncturists promote health lifestyle/behaviour changes within their treatments? How do they enable these changes? Highlights from a review of qualitative and quantitative research.

 

Jonquil is a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner with a background in psychology. She co-founded Arc Integrated Health in London in 2006 and ran a private clinic focusing on women’s health and fertility at Hammersmith Hospital. She now practises in Hove and is completing her PhD research at Southampton University with a team of health psychologists and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) experts. Her research is looking at lifestyle/behaviour change in traditional acupuncture. She has published academic articles on acupuncture and CAM in relation to lifestyle change and clinical communication, and writes articles in this area for popular health magazines. She assists in teaching research methods at Southampton University and is an editor for the BAcC Acu magazine.

Jonquil’s interest in Chinese health traditions began when she joined a tai-chi class while studying at Sussex University over 20 years ago. She believes healthy lifestyle practices are fundamental to traditional Chinese medicine, in which patients are encouraged to participate in their health through diet, exercise, moderation, practices to calm the mind and to connect to the natural world.

 
 
Michelle Venter

Michelle Venter

Setting up & evaluating an acupuncture service for students with mental health problems [title tbc]

 

under construction